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Fisherman’s Friends: The Musical

21st March 2023 - 25th March 2023

 

“Fall for this record-breaking great British musical – hook line and sinker!”

FISHERMAN’S FRIENDS: THE MUSICAL

Book By Amanda Whittington

Based on the Screenplay by Nick Moorcroft, Meg Leonard, Piers Ashworth

Directed by James Grieve

“The true story of the Cornish chart topping buoy band”

Based on the true story of the chart-topping Cornish singing sensations and their hit 2019 movie, Fisherman’s Friends: The Musical is a feel-good voyage about friendship, community and music which smashed box office records in Cornwall.

When a group of Cornish fishermen came together to sing the traditional working songs they’d sung for generations, nobody, least of all the fishermen, expected the story to end on the Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury.  They are spotted by a fish-out-of-water music manager on a trip from London, who must learn that there is more to life than selling your sole for fifteen minutes of fame.

A star cast includes James Gaddas, (Coronation Street, Billy Elliot the Musical), Parisa Shahmir (Mamma Mia!), Robert Duncan (Drop the Dead Donkey), Anton Stephans (The X Factor) and Susan Penhaligon (Bouquet of Barbed Wire).

So, climb aboard, find your sea legs and allow yourself to fall for this critically acclaimed musical – hook, line and sinker!

“Brilliant & riotous fun, it’s the talk of the town” myCornwall Magazine

“This Musical has hit written all over it” Cornwall Live

“It raises the rafters and leaves you with a huge grin on your face” Curtain Up

Running time: 2 hours 35 minutes (including interval)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Details

Start:
21st March 2023
End:
25th March 2023
Event Categories:
, ,

Venue

Festival Theatre
Grange Road
Malvern, WR14 3HB

Other

Price:
Tues-Thurs Eves & Sat Mat: £44.80, £42.56, £40.32, £38.08, £35.84
Wed & Thurs Mats: £42.56, £40.32, £38.08, £35.84 & £33.60
Fri & Sat Eves: £47.07, £44.80, £42.56, £40.32 & £38.08
Members Discounts Apply
Concessions £2 off Over 60s/Unwaged
Under 26s £16.80
Prices Include 12% Booking Fee
Show Times:
Tuesday 21st to Saturday 25th March '23
Evenings at 7.30pm
Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday matinees at 2.30pm

Event Reviews

  • Jane

    Fabulous show. Hilarious in parts, wonderful musicality. Great all round.

  • Dan

    WOW! Make this the musical you see this year, it’s outstanding. One of the best yet.

  • Ray

    Thankyou for putting a smile on my face .An amazing evening.

  • The View From The Stalls

    Fresh yet traditional, a unique show and a deserved success!

    Fisherman's Friends is a big show with a cast of around two dozen and encompasses basically three groups of people: the fishermen singers, the women who support them and the band who provide the music. All three sets of people work seamlessly together on stage making this a piece of theatre which really is all-embracing. And, from the men in particular, you get solos from actors who you may not consider to be singers as the cast includes James Gaddas (most recently seen in Hollyoaks), Robert Duncan (who was the full-of-nonsense jargon Gus Hedges in Drop The Dead Donkey) and Susan Penhaligon from Bouquet of Barbed Wire and A Fine Romance. In fact, without exception, all of the cast proved to have the strong voices necessary to accurately portray the Cornish fishermen and their years of singing traditional shanties which described their lives, hopes, trials and tribulations.

    You don't need to have watched either of the 2 filmed versions of their rise to fame as this touring show can be judged as a standalone piece irrespective of the cinema releases. And as a theatre production, it has some definite advantages. The music, played by 7 very talented musicians, is live and integrates very neatly into the show, which by extension, allows the singers to perform at their best when an instrumental backing is required. But for much of the time, as in the real world of shanty singers, many of the songs are performed a' Capella, proudly and loudly.

    The first half of the show takes place in Cornwall, in the village of Port Isaac which does not always welcome the intrusion of "emmets" (non-locals or "ants") - this was, after all the actual setting for Doc Martin too! The "intruder" in this case is washed up music plugger Danny (James Langley), a real fish out of water, who ends up at the harbour almost by mistake. He promises the world, expecting to take his cut, but promises do not always get realised. County rivalries are also present and one can only guess at the response of the Devon audience to the singers' activities around the Welcome to Devon signpost! As things develop, the action moves to London in an attempt to get these reluctant harmony singers a record contract and maybe an appearance at Glastonbury. Again, promises are broken but, accidentally ending up in a gay bar and performing In The Navy (well, it is a song about the sea!) provided one of the most hilarious moments of the show. Apart from that rather unconventional shanty, many of the songs are well known - from "What shall we do with the drunken sailor?" to "When the boat comes in", via "Sloop John B", the latter beautifully sung as a duet in a blossoming love scene. And "Haul Away, Joe" and "Keep Hauling" not only reflect the fishermen's trade but also life in general, especially when disaster strikes. For this is how they deal with life - family, companionship and tradition are at the very heart of this community. All the more so where tragedy occurs - something all fishermen must dread and be prepared for when they lose one of their own.

    Aside from the community singing in the local pub and on the quayside, there are also two parallel plots which are that the pub where the singers meet is heavily in debt but can owner and new to fatherhood Rowan (Dan Buckley) find a way to extricate himself from the dilemma by approaching Danny or is he making a pact with the devil? And can Danny ever be accepted into the community and more especially into the heart of Alwyn (Parisa Shahmir)?

    The show leans heavily on family, which is strong in these communities and is no bad thing, as the various generations have to work together even though their ideals and aspirations may well be different.

    So given that the show gained a rapturous reception in Plymouth (by the sea), how did it fare in landlocked Malvern? Judging by the reaction (standing ovation and massive applause) the entire cast without exception can be very proud to have brought a little bit of Cornwall to Worcestershire. The only thing missing were those delicious pasties!

    For a further insight into how the show was put together, have a listen to my interview with Dakota Starr who plays Ben, along with a couple of songs from the show:
    https://1drv.ms/u/s!As__InsoO2XBjnJs6tCzFGYaOtI1?e=jG7jpI

  • Showtime! John Phillpott

    AYE, let’s haul away, haul away me hearties, and set sail for a tale that’ll so warm the old cockles that they’ll be in mortal peril of overheating.

    Yes, that how it gets you, folks. Every har-har and avast and belay seafaring type of utterance fills – nay floods the bilges – of the senses, such is the infectiousness of every single second of this nice and decidedly nautical odyssey.

    In fact, every musical moment of this story makes you want to weigh anchor, trim the jibs, hoist the halyards, and bend with the bowsprit… me lads!

    Such a pity we live in the landlocked Midlands. Mind you, we have enough of the old rum, concertina and general marine merriment to go round here, so there’s never any danger of a mutiny in this corner of the fo’csle.

    For two-and-a-half glorious, brine-lashed hours, we are transported to the Cornish fishing village of Port Isaac, where a group of shanty-singing local fishermen suddenly find that the songs of their highly specialised, regional trade had not just national, but global appeal.

    It’s the stuff of showbiz legend how they went from pub backroom to a record deal and the main stage at Glastonbury, turning almost overnight a communal singing hobby into a leading music market brand.

    Oh yes, they found their plaice all right – but never once sold their soles. Sorry. But you knew that was going to come at some stage, didn’t you?

    However, peering through the sea mist and then the glitzy commercial fog, we glimpse a truth that is arguably of greater significance than the obvious good fortune that has befallen our Cornish buoy band.

    And it’s this. Probably for the first time since the folk revival of the early 1960s, a true people’s music has broken through the bastions of formulaic pop pap and established itself as a gale force to be reckoned with, and one that could also go on to invigorate the popular sounds of the future.

    Pause to think for a moment. This hasn’t happened since black rhythm and blues smashed the then existing musical template seven decades ago. As the world-renowned blues writer and music expert Paul Merry so astutely observed in his ground-breaking book America’s Gift, there is undoubtedly a parallel course of development that is common to both the blues and the shanty.

    Both are firmly rooted in the work song tradition, and both developed in the aftermath of military upheavals and the ensuing social chaos, the former just after the American Civil War, the latter in the wake of the Napoleonic Wars.

    Its heyday was not long. For the age of the shanty effectively ended with the advent of steam and the demise of sail, with all the hard labour that entailed. But thankfully, the tradition somehow survived in the hearts of the seafaring communities of England’s south-west.

    And here on stage we could see and hear it in all its splendour, those famous Malvern Hills coming alive to the sound of a very wonderful music indeed. There is no doubt at all that with director James Grieve at the tiller, this stunningly talented cast steers it way through song after song, some rousing, others poignant to the point of leaving a tear in the eye in its wake.

    Fisherman’s Friends will certainly find a berth in the great musical hall of fame, of that I am certain. In the meantime, my advice for you is to cast off, and this week make Malvern your first port of call without delay.

  • Curtain Call Reviews

    Having seen this show last year and falling in love with its infectious nature, I knew I had to catch it again and it really did cement the fact that this could be my favourite new musical!

    Fisherman’s Friends The Musical charts the rise to fame of the oldest boy band in Port Isaac, Cornwall. A true story which has garnered many fans, and which has two films to its name. There is nothing not to love about how this story makes you feel as you leave the theatre. It’s a story of complete joy, friendship, incredible music and a wonderful sense of community.

    This show is a complete ensemble piece, the stage filled with musicians who take front and centre stage showcasing their incredible talent under the musical direction of James William-Pattison. Each time the band strikes up it gives me goosebumps as the sound created is toe tapping and hand clapping, extremely infectious.

    Leading the band is Jim (James Gaddas) a rather grumpy fisherman who is very attached to his beloved Cornwall, his friends and the local pub, the Golden Lion. His wife had left him and his daughter Alwyn (Parisa Shahmir) years earlier and he is still very bitter but finds happiness singing sea shanties with his closest friends. Gaddas gives a polished performance with his gravelly Cornish accent. Shahmir as Alwyn really does have the standout voice of the evening, with somewhat of a haunting sound with exquisite sound design from Dan Samson. Her voice fills the theatre and has a real calming effect when stripped back from the rest of the high energy numbers.

    If you’re familiar with the Fisherman’s Friends, then you will have heard the many sea shanties they perform. The overall sound from the band was captivating, with the acapella numbers really being the star. The harmonies were so gorgeous you were literally bathing in their splendour. Stand out voices come from Pete Gallagher (Leadville) and Hadrian Delacey (Archie). A pure treat for the ears!

    The instigator of the bands success comes from Danny (Jason Langley) a failed music producer who is still out to find the next big thing. There were many funny moments upon meeting the patrons of the Golden Lion pub and he was very much treated like an outsider at first. It was lovely to see how their friendship blossomed and how he was accepted into the tight knit community. Langley played the rather brash Londoner well, and there was wonderful chemistry between him and Parisa Shahmir (Alwyn) who establish a relationship, after a very rocky start.

    There are some great scenes in the show, including a trip to the bright lights of London where the band find themselves in a gay bar. The up-to-date references are also front and centre especially when some of the band start singing ‘Wellerman’ and Jim comments “that song will never catch on”, of course a reference to the very successful version of this song that appeared online.

    The set by Lucy Osborne has us first on board the fishing vessel, out on the high seas with the Fisherman carrying out their “day job”. This is then wheeled away, and we are inside the Golden Lion pub where the majority of the action happens. When the musicians are not intermingled with the rest of the cast, they stand around the top of the set. This upper half of the set was used throughout as an entrance/exit point for many characters. The lighting design by Johanna Town came into its own during the darker scene where unfortunately Jim’s Dad Jago (Robert Duncan) suffers a heart attack whilst out at sea. The use of hand held spotlights really captured the moment.

    There are many reasons why you should try and see this show before it sets sail for the last time. If nothing else, the music will have you shuffling in your seat, tapping your feet and singing as you leave. Under the Direction of James Grieve this new musical has legs to run and run, and a West End transfer wouldn’t be out of the question (I hope so anyway!). There is power in friendship and community and you absolutely feel part of the Fisherman’s Friends by the end of the show. The love and respect they have for each other is certainly a lesson a lot of us should take on board.

  • Plutonium Sox

    Based on the true story of Cornish band the Fisherman’s Friends, this musical tells the story of their rise to fame. As a group of fishermen singing traditional sea shanties, they decided to try to raise a bit of money for charity. From there, they may have predicted their rise to local stardom. However, it is unlikely any of them would have anticipated playing on the pyramid stage at Glastonbury or having a film made about them. We headed to Malvern Theatres for opening night of Fisherman’s Friends the Musical.

    Much like the film, Fisherman’s Friends the Musical focuses predominantly on the arrival of record promoter Danny in the Cornish village. Blown away by the sound of the Fisherman’s Friends singing their traditional sea shanties, Danny sets out to persuade them that they could have a hit record. Far from being wowed by the promises of fame and fortune, the “drinking group with a singing problem” laugh in Danny’s face at the suggestion.

    The story follows Danny’s attempts to convince the men that his boss at Island Records will love their songs. An unsuccessful demo makes its way to the record company, who refuse to see the group. Not to be deterred, Danny tells the men that the record producer loved them, and they set out for London.

    Whilst the trip to London is unsuccessful, it’s not long before videos of the gang go viral. The record producers decide to sign them after all and the album is produced. One of the band sadly dies before the album breaks into the charts. With some question over whether the band will sing again, their future hangs in the balance. Thankfully the promise of playing on the Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury provides the inspiration needed for the rest of the show to play out with a happy ending.

    A sub-plot of a love story between Danny and villager Alywyn dances along throughout the show. Played by Parisa Shahmir, Alywyn also has an exceptional voice and an interest in getting a recording contract.

    From the moment the cast burst onto the stage, upbeat, dramatic music plays throughout the show. As you would expect from a show about the Fisherman’s Friends, there was plenty of a cappella singing. Alongside this, various instruments were played on stage. Melodeons, fiddles, a cello, double bass and what we thought was a tin whistle all made an appearance. There was also a banjo, drum box and banjo and I’m sure there are instruments I’ve missed.

    The story was told in a compelling and dramatic way with great use of the Fisherman’s Friends songs. Barely a moment went by where a song of some description wasn’t playing. Either as part of the story or as a baseline to speech. Would you enjoy the show if you weren’t into folk music? Absolutely. Whilst the music is the biggest part of the production, you can’t fail to be moved by the story itself.

    If we’re honest, few of us would make it through that production without a foot tapping out the beat. You don’t have to love folk music to appreciate it. My girls enjoy the Fisherman’s Friends music, but it’s not really their sort of thing. Nonetheless, they were captivated by the show and jigging along to the music.

    This show was an absolute joy from start to finish. With upbeat music and an inspiring true story, you can’t fail to enjoy it. We went along on opening night, a Tuesday evening in term time. Sometimes these midweek evenings can be a little quiet at the theatre. Not this time though, it was absolutely packed!

    When the show finished, the audience gave them a standing ovation. Another rare occurrence for a Tuesday evening but well deserved. This is a high energy show with a gripping plot and rousing music. Not only would I recommend going to watch, but I’d happily go and see it again myself.

  • What's on Worcestershire - Jo Farrar

    Fisherman’s Friends has dropped anchor in Malvern, complete with a trawler’s-worth of talented performers who sing sea shanties and folk songs about friendship and community, stepping, shuffling and stomping their way through a host of energetic dance routines in the process.

    Based on a true and truly terrific tale about an ordinary group of blokes - working hard as fishermen, farmers, builders and shopkeepers in the small Cornish village of Port Isaac - the story follows their efforts to raise money for charity by singing traditional songs passed down from their forefathers. An unlikely, er, ‘buoy band’ if ever there was one, they call themselves Fisherman’s Friends - although there’s an amusing moment in the show when it’s suggested they could instead be known as The Cornish Pasties!

    Welcomed in by the soft sound of seagulls, you can almost taste the sea salt in the air. The action starts with the enigmatic sound of the shipping forecast, before a dark vessel appears on stage, rocking perilously on a stormy sea. Later scenes deliver cosier coastal vibes at the harbour and in the pub.

    The band are discovered by chance by a fish-out-of-water music manager named Danny, a man who, on a trip from London, must learn that there’s more to life than selling your soul for 15 minutes of fame. His life is transformed by Port Isaac, the fishermen and their shanties. But it’s a coming together that serves both parties well: Danny’s arrival in the singing seafarers’ lives kickstarts an adventure that will eventually see them securing a top-10 hit in the UK charts and performing at the legendary Glastonbury Festival.

    Under the direction of James Grieves, James Gaddas convincingly leads the a cappella ‘crew’ as Captain Jim, a devoted son and father. But Fisherman’s Friends is truly an ensemble piece, and the strongest scenes are when the cast perform as one.

    There are more than 30 musical numbers to enjoy, including most of the songs from the hit 2019 film version of the story. The cast are accompanied by very talented folk musicians who brilliantly enhance the atmosphere of each scene, but the ‘high tide’ of the show is undoubtedly the singing. If I were to pick out a stand-alone performer, it would have to be Parisa Shahmir, who plays Jim’s daughter, Alwyn. Lightheartedly described as the ‘Taylor Swift of the South West’, her voice is pitch perfect, beautiful, and never better showcased than in her mesmerising rendition of Tidal Pool.

    The real strength of the show, however, is the whole cast’s camaraderie, with each individual bringing a wealth of talent to proceedings. Fisherman’s Friends The Musical certainly boasts a fine catch of amazing voices and great acting talent.

    It was no surprise at all when last night’s audience rose to their feet to give the production a standing ovation. This whale of a tale about friendship, community and music certainly floated my boat, and there’s every chance it will float yours too. So why not climb aboard, find your sea legs and allow yourself to fall for this critically acclaimed musical - hook, line and sinker!

  • View From the Stalls

    Fresh yet traditional, a unique show and a deserved success!

    Fisherman's Friends is a big show with a cast of around two dozen and encompasses basically three groups of people: the fishermen singers, the women who support them and the band who provide the music. All three sets of people work seamlessly together on stage making this a piece of theatre which really is all-embracing. And, from the men in particular, you get solos from actors who you may not consider to be singers as the cast includes James Gaddas (most recently seen in Hollyoaks), Robert Duncan (who was the full-of-nonsense jargon Gus Hedges in Drop The Dead Donkey) and Susan Penhaligon from Bouquet of Barbed Wire and A Fine Romance. In fact, without exception, all of the cast proved to have the strong voices necessary to accurately portray the Cornish fishermen and their years of singing traditional shanties which described their lives, hopes, trials and tribulations.

    You don't need to have watched either of the 2 filmed versions of their rise to fame as this touring show can be judged as a standalone piece irrespective of the cinema releases. And as a theatre production, it has some definite advantages. The music, played by 7 very talented musicians, is live and integrates very neatly into the show, which by extension, allows the singers to perform at their best when an instrumental backing is required. But for much of the time, as in the real world of shanty singers, many of the songs are performed a' Capella, proudly and loudly.

    The first half of the show takes place in Cornwall, in the village of Port Isaac which does not always welcome the intrusion of "emmets" (non-locals or "ants") - this was, after all the actual setting for Doc Martin too! The "intruder" in this case is washed up music plugger Danny (James Langley), a real fish out of water, who ends up at the harbour almost by mistake. He promises the world, expecting to take his cut, but promises do not always get realised. County rivalries are also present and one can only guess at the response of the Devon audience to the singers' activities around the Welcome to Devon signpost! As things develop, the action moves to London in an attempt to get these reluctant harmony singers a record contract and maybe an appearance at Glastonbury. Again, promises are broken but, accidentally ending up in a gay bar and performing In The Navy (well, it is a song about the sea!) provided one of the most hilarious moments of the show. Apart from that rather unconventional shanty, many of the songs are well known - from "What shall we do with the drunken sailor?" to "When the boat comes in", via "Sloop John B", the latter beautifully sung as a duet in a blossoming love scene. And "Haul Away, Joe" and "Keep Hauling" not only reflect the fishermen's trade but also life in general, especially when disaster strikes. For this is how they deal with life - family, companionship and tradition are at the very heart of this community. All the more so where tragedy occurs - something all fishermen must dread and be prepared for when they lose one of their own.

    Aside from the community singing in the local pub and on the quayside, there are also two parallel plots which are that the pub where the singers meet is heavily in debt but can owner and new to fatherhood Rowan (Dan Buckley) find a way to extricate himself from the dilemma by approaching Danny or is he making a pact with the devil? And can Danny ever be accepted into the community and more especially into the heart of Alwyn (Parisa Shahmir)?

    The show leans heavily on family, which is strong in these communities and is no bad thing, as the various generations have to work together even though their ideals and aspirations may well be different.

    So given that the show gained a rapturous reception in Plymouth (by the sea), how did it fare in landlocked Malvern? Judging by the reaction (standing ovation and massive applause) the entire cast without exception can be very proud to have brought a little bit of Cornwall to Worcestershire. The only thing missing were those delicious pasties!

  • Fairy Powered Productions - Courie Amado Juneau

    Fisherman’s Friends The Musical is based on the true story of the singing Cornish fishermen who were discovered by a London A&R man who, whilst visiting their hometown of Port Isaac, persuaded them to allow him to record a demo and they became a sensation.

    There was much to enjoy in this exuberant work. I absolutely loved the lead couple Danny (the out of towner) played with commendable personality, depth and verve by Jason Langley and local lass Alywyn played by Parisa Shahmir. Parisa had a gorgeous voice and the musical highlights for me were her playing guitar whilst singing and, especially, during her solo song when she was reflecting on love, thinking of Danny. Just beautiful.

    When the fishermen went to London was their highlight. There were some hilarious scenes playing on the fish out of water aspects of “yokels” in the Big Smoke. Wonderful stuff. And while the men were away, the ladies ensemble back home had their most effective group scene – complete with fantastic ensemble song and dance routine.

    Jago (Robert Duncan) and his wife Maggie (played tonight by understudy Janet Mooney) were amusing and tender, with both providing emotional highlights for entirely different reasons. And I very much warmed to the plight of young couple Rowan (Dan Buckley) and Sally (Hazel Monaghan), with these fine actors giving wonderful performances. Sensitively nuanced portrayals from all concerned that genuinely made one feel for and like their characters.

    The musicianship was superb, the dancing was joyous, the cast gave it their all with a gusto that was commendable. The show contained a lot of humour with some genuinely funny one liners. And it was amazing to see live musicians on stage providing atmosphere and colour.

    There was so much to enjoy here that I found myself asking why it was that I was left slightly unsatisfied. I’m not sure how much was fiction for dramatic effect and how much was the unvarnished truth but I didn’t enjoy watching the visitor to the village treated in a rather unfriendly manner by the locals. Indeed, the only time that the Cornish characters seemed to warm to the Londoner was when he was lining their pockets! It would have been nice to have had them like him without any ulterior motive, (ie just as a friend who enjoyed their music and wanted to help them share it with the world). Perhaps that was the way it was, but I found it uncomfortable viewing. It was obvious I was in the minority in having any problem with the show as everyone else seemed to love it. It’s not that I didn’t enjoy it, I did – just that I would have loved it more had it felt a bit more, well… friendly.

    If you enjoy the music of the original band, or the films about them, if you like folk or Irish music (much of the music reminded me of The Pogues), if you like big dance numbers and live musicians onstage and if you have any interest in sea shanties or Cornwall I’m certain you will love this show and have a ball.

  • Malvern Observer - Euan Rose

    AS A reviewer I am privileged to see a wide range of theatre from the spectacular and glamorous to the small and meaningful – but hardly ever do I come out feeling I have witnessed something so joyous as this production of Fisherman’s Friends The Musical at Malvern last night.

    From the moment the transparent curtain goes up on a fishing boat in stormy waters manned by bearded men in day-glow orange weather suits, you can taste the salt. The singing is infectious and so is the energy – I’ve rarely seen a company – and this is a fairly large one – so together and so obviously enjoying what they are doing.
    Yes, I had seen and enjoyed the film (based on the endearing story of the Cornish Fisherman’s Choir) some time ago, but for me it doesn’t compare to the magical retelling in this stage version.

    The songs are mostly sea shanties and are jubilant rather than showstoppers – it’s all about the delivery and my word, does this production deliver!

    The direction from James Grieve takes us through every emotion in the gambit and never once lulls.

    Of course it needs a good book to link the songs, whilst establishing characters and telling the tale. Amanda Whittington has done a grand job – there’s love, wit, pathos, belly laughs and just the right sprinkle of heartbreak to bring a tear of sadness to mingle with those of joy.

    Matt Cole’s choreography is bang on – from banging down the sea boots, to banging on beer crates and sea chests and stomping to the banging of the drum. So hard do they bang at times the auditorium vibrates.

    Lucy Osborne has designed a set that moves seamlessly from bar to beach, from land to sea and from the white sands of Port Issac in Cornwall to the colorful club land of London. There are ladders to link the levels and spaces for set pieces to be stored. Indeed seeing the transitions particularly through a smoke haze adds another dimension to the enjoyment.

    Johanna Town lights it all up with everything from sunshine to torchlight, her stormy sea effects are most imaginative. Sound balance and effects from Dan Samson are audio perfection.

    A special shout out to an unsung hero, that’s casting director Jim Arnold who has given us a perfect team.

    The family at the centre of the story are Grandparents and old salts, Jago and Maggie, engagingly played by Robert Duncan and Janet Mooney.

    James Gaddas is flawless as Jago and Maggies gravel-voiced son – that’s Jim with the charming smile and captivating scowl.

    Parisa Shahmir shines as Jim’s wild eyed and gentle hearted daughter Alywyn – the perfect love interest.

    Jason Langley is narcissistic washed up record producer Danny who finds solace, love and rekindled purpose amongst the singing seamen whose lives he wants to change from fishing boats to Ferraris. Langley is spot on, believable, cringe worthy and perfect in his redemption.

    Fishermen’s Friend’s celebrates community, tradition and values. It’s a love story on many levels, an endearing tale and a unique musical.

    The whole cast was a magical mix of musicians and actors giving their all – and we lapped it up.

    At the walkdown the audience was on their feet celebrating along with the cast; strangers chatted on the way out and the air buzzed with delight.

  • Val Wallcroft

    On a cold, wet, and grim Wednesday afternoon, I took a chance and went to watch the Fisherman's Friends now showing in Malvern....I was so very glad I took that chance! - it was a total joy! In fact I think it was one of the best musicals I've seen for a while.

    The stage 'set' was suitably atmospheric with a gently swaying fishing trawler, mist rolling in and fishermen sorting through the days 'catch' and singing sea shanty's

    The fishermen and women of many parts of Cornwall, having received much praise for their harmonic shanty songs, continue to grow in popularity.

    The Fisherman's friends was formed by a group of Port Isaacs sea-faring locals - many years ago.

    If you can get a ticket to see the remaining shows it will not disappoint and I guarantee you will be foot-tapping all the way home!!

    Check with box office for availability.

    What a joy!

  • Liz

    I’ve followed the real Fisherman’s Friends for a long time, after first seeing them in the beautiful Cornish setting of the Minack Theatre. The Musical captured the group’s wonderful vocal harmonies, and succeeded in weaving the traditional sea shanties into a contemporary storyline. Modern folk sung by Parisa Shahmir added contrast and variety. The stage design was excellent, especially for a touring show. My enjoyment was marred only by the man in the seat next to me, who insisted on singing along loudly to every chorus.


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