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Tue 26

The Last Duel (18)

October 22nd - October 28th
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Play/Create at Malvern Theatres

October 26th 10:30 am
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The Addams Family 2 (PG)

October 26th 3:00 pm
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The Big Draw 2021 – Make a Change

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Tango Fire

1st March 2020 7:30 pm

 

The phenomenal, award-winning Tango Fire returns to the UK direct from a West End run, due to incredible popular demand.

Starring internationally renowned Argentinean tango superstars German Cornejo and Gisela Galeassi, who are joined by a cast of extraordinary tango dancers, including World Tango champions, this is a fiery and explosive journey through the history of authentic Argentine Tango.

Six incredible couples show off some of the speediest footwork and tightest twirling in the business while demonstrating their individual styles, accompanied by the astonishing Tango Fuego Quartet, playing live music on stage from tango’s most famous composers, including Piazzolla, Pugliese and Gardel, this is a sizzling, sensual show guaranteed to make pulses race.

Running time: approx. 2 hours 3 minutes, including interval.

 

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Details

Date:
1st March 2020
Time:
7:30 pm
Event Category:

Other

Price:
£32.50 & £28.50
Prices include 12% booking fee
Show Times:
Sunday 1st March '20 at 7.30pm

Event Reviews

  • Richard Edmonds

    Over the years, there have been several companies touring the country all specialising in the, all you needed was a willing partner, a glass of wine and
    tango, but Tango Fire wins the gold. The dancers were electrifying, with that supple sensuousness without
    which the tango is lifeless.
    Twisting, spinning, or simply staring out at us with that haughty, condescending look which speaks volumes, they took their
    audience prisoner from the first pulsing rasp of the violin and held it captive until the
    final tumultuous applause took the roof off the theatre, and their audience shouted for more
    The tango has its roots in political rebellion, a liberated sexuality free from social constraint and a delight
    in dancing which at one point was the only thing you needed you needed , along with a dance partner, a couple of
    glasses of wine and a pack of cheap cigarettes. Sometimes you danced it in a brothel, sometimes on the city
    boardwalks at fiesta time.
    The poverty-stricken young Latin-Americans who danced the tango, came initially from a broken, penniless society.
    They scratched a living by day and found a kind of freedom after dark
    in Rio's gas-lit dance halls ( in Paris during the twenties it was much the same thing, with the raffish masculinity
    of the male Apache dancers and their submissive partners exciting the patrons of these seedy bars not to mention
    the artists such as Toulouse Lautrec who were also around and produced masterpieces out of the girls and their lovers)
    But Tango Fire had the amazing capacity to bring back memories such as these again and again.

    As the dancers lifted an amazing evening,almost into impossibilities, using those swift interchanging leg moves,
    interchanging partners, dancing impossible steps as though impossibilities simply did not exist, with lifts of the
    kind you get in a Kenneth McMillan classical ballet, movements where the girl is held high in the air supported on her
    partner's hand before being returned to stage level with a quick flick of the supporting hand.
    Marvellous to watch-- and not once, but half a dozen times, as through this was something you did without effort.
    A change of costume--more dark sequins and sparkling show dresses with skirts slit almost to the waist, set against the men, many of whom wore
    that traditional male attire of a dark, double--breasted suit with a white silk scarf tucked into the neck. A kind of tough formality, and suddenly away the company went into that
    old favourite "La Cumparsita" ( an Astaire/ Rogers favourite in one of their 30s movies)
    Occasionally the men danced together or in a formation and again it became a refining experience to be savoured like a rare wine
    It was a time to forget your winter troubles and revel in brilliant dancing with four superb musicians underscoring the whole evening with superb playing.
    Another feather in Malvern's splendid many-feathered cap.

  • Ian


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